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A frequently updated round-up of recent books by alumni, faculty, staff, and other Spiders. To submit yours, email us at magazine@richmond.edu.
It Happened Like This: A Life in Alaska

It Happened Like This: A Life in Alaska

Adrienne Hall Lindholm, W'95
This coming-of-age memoir takes readers on an intimate journey into adulthood and the depth and comfort of wilderness. “You won’t find a better marriage proposal, or bear encounter, or life lesson from a mother moose than the ones hiding in these pages,” one reviewer writes.
Grandpa's Tent

Grandpa's Tent

The Rev. Mary Davila, '98, and The Rev. Sarah Kinney, '99
This book deals with topics that most people would really rather not talk about,” Davila told an interviewer. “People feel afraid to bring up the subject of death, and they don’t feel equipped to answer children’s questions. If this book brings comfort … then our work has been fruitful.”
The Field Guide to Ocean Voyaging

The Field Guide to Ocean Voyaging

Ed Sobey, R'69
This color guide is a “primer for anyone who will be voyaging on the ocean,” writes Sobey, who earned his doctorate in oceanography. “It doesn’t tell you everything about the ocean, only those things you are most likely to see. I have traveled hundreds of thousands of miles on ships, boats, and kayaks.”
Governance of Arctic Shipping

Governance of Arctic Shipping

Kristine Dalaker Kraabel, ed., W'92 and L'97
In this guide for specialists, Kraabel and other experts identify and examine issues that are becoming more pressing as Arctic ice recedes and shipping there increases. “The backstory to the book may be of greater interest,” she writes. It arose from a presentation she made at Richmond’s School of Law in 2016.
The Thin Light of Freedom

The Thin Light of Freedom

Edward L. Ayers

Historian and former university president Edward Ayers received the Gilder Lerhman Lincoln Prize and the Avery O.Craven Award for The Thin Light of Freedom: The Civil War and Emancipation in the Heart of America. In it, Ayers traces the second half of the Civil War through the eyes of ordinary citizens in Augusta County, Virginia, and Franklin County, Pennsylvania. It is the companion volume of In the Presence of Mine Enemies: War in the Heart of America, 1859-1863.

Darkness Falls on the Land of Light

Darkness Falls on the Land of Light

Douglas L. Winiarski

Columbia University awarded the 2018 Bancroft Prize in American History and Diplomacy to religious studies professor Douglas L. Winiarski for Darkness Falls on the Land of Light. His book examines the changing ways that ordinary people in 18th-century New England experienced religion as membership in the Puritan church declined.

Each semester, Winiarski opens his archive of photographs of manuscripts, sermon notes, diaries, and other materials to students.

“I love looking at 18th-century manuscripts, and I realize our students do, too,” he said. “I want them to experience the thrill of discovering something new and having something new to say.”

The Tulip Shirt Murders

The Tulip Shirt Murders

Heather Weidner, GC'00
In the second book in the Delanie Fitzgerald mystery series, resident sleaze Chaz Smith has popped back into Delanie’s life as she tries to uncover who is bootlegging CDs from a local music producer — and finds more than she expected as she tries to solve the case before someone else is murdered.
Design Your Future

Design Your Future

Dominick Quartuccio, '01
Inspired by his own experience after leaving a 15-year career in financial services, Quartuccio breaks the process of ending drift and starting to live fully into three steps. Those with “an enviable lifestyle, on paper,” he writes, should re-examine their goals to see whether they have consciously designed their future.
Art and Authority

Art and Authority

Karen Gover, '97

Gover calls her book “a philosophical essay on artistic freedom.” In it, she questions why some artists receive legal recognition and the protection of their works while others do not, considering these questions through copyright law and moral rights laws, with a specific focus on authors and their authority over their literary works.

Lucas Plays

Lucas Plays

Christina Shawn, '02
Inspired by son Lucas’s efforts to learn violin and her own experience as a reading specialist, Shawn taps into the power of music to tell a story filled with imagination and emotion. As Lucas begins to play, his world transforms to the tune of his violin with superheroes, monsters, and more.
The Nest

The Nest

Thomas N. Carter, R'79
In this e-book, Tim Crawford is a writer who hears a deathbed confession from an aging, veteran sniper that he’s known since childhood in the old neighborhood. It leaves him with a chilling secret about President Kennedy’s assassination on Nov. 22, 1963.
Love Ain't No Reality Show

Love Ain't No Reality Show

Connie Kuykendall, L'99
In this sequel to the romance novel Love Ain’t No Soap Opera, Selah Morgan’s wedding plans shatter after a disastrous wedding-dress reality show exposes her insecurities and stretches thin both her relationship and her new celebrity status in the Hollywood spotlight.
Tell Me More

Tell Me More

Kelly Corrigan, W'89

Inspired by a debate at Corrigan’s dinner table, the stories in Tell Me More are an argument for the power of the right words at the right moment to change everything.

In “I Was Wrong,” the New York Times bestselling author comes clean about her disastrous role in an epic argument. In “No,” she admires her mother’s ability to set boundaries and her liberating willingness to be unpopular.

Blood Brothers

Blood Brothers

James P. O'Mealia, R'80

Blood Brothers, the sequel to O’Mealia’s Fiasco, combines financial intrigue with personal crisis to create a tense thriller about a friendship that runs bone deep. Roger Maydock and Thomas Morris have a fraught friendship dating back to their prep school days. Now, Roger needs his friend’s help to rescue his insurance company. Thomas tries to save the day, but a blockbuster secret brings unexpected complications.

Flights of Fancy

Flights of Fancy

Randy Fitzgerald, R'63 and G'64

Flights of Fancy is a collection of Fitzgerald’s columns and anecdotes, many first printed in the Richmond Times-Dispatch and other area publications. He writes humorously about his family, particularly his unpredictable and irrespressible wife.

Virginia Wine

Virginia Wine

Andrew A. Painter, L'07

Painter’s comprehensive history of the Virginia wine industry chronicles the dynamic personalities, diverse places, and engrossing personal and political struggles that have helped establish the Old Dominion as one of the nation’s pre-eminent wine regions.

Heroes of Richmond

Heroes of Richmond

Edited by Scott T. Allison

Essays on leadership by 16 students in Allison’s first-year seminar last fall examine the complex history of Richmond over 400 years through its heroes, including Maggie Walker, John Marshall, Oliver Hill, Arthur Ashe, Westhampton’s May Keller, Mary Sue Terry, W’69, and others.

Ginseng Tango

Ginseng Tango

Cheryl Pallant
Pallant’s memoir of living in South Korea is the middle book of her three-book contract. The final one, called Writing and the Body in Motion and due out this spring, arises from her experience teaching students in the theater and dance department.
Only the Dead Know Brooklyn

Only the Dead Know Brooklyn

Chris Vola, '07

Ryan Driggs has lived in Brooklyn for 128 years, 96 of them as one of the last members of a tribe of blood-eating immortals who have called the borough home since before colonial times. His life is uneventful until he meets Jennifer, a human from Manhattan with whom he falls in love. When she is kidnapped by a tribe of Manhattan vampires, Ryan discovers that, for a reason unknown to him, he is a target, too.

The Do-Over: A Memoir of Work and Love

The Do-Over: A Memoir of Work and Love

Amanda Mackenzie, '99

By age 30, MacKenzie was married with a promising career in ministry. Three years later, she left both behind.

The Do-Over: A Memoir of Work and Love chronicles her unexpected journey through divorce, out of the ministry, over the Italian Alps, and onto a small farm in central Massachusetts.

“My journey has been one of listening to my heart and finding the courage to follow where it leads,” she said in a Boston Globe article.

How to Find a Flock

How to Find a Flock

Chris Vola, '07
This collection of short stories examines human nature by exploring the crippling conflicts of unique characters. Written with bitingly honest prose, Vola conveys a sense of realism that is intended for anyone who has endured a problem in life.
Pirates, Merchants, Settlers, and Slaves

Pirates, Merchants, Settlers, and Slaves

Kevin P. McDonald, '94
This book explores the vast trade network created by the relationship between colonial merchants and Euro-American pirates. McDonald sheds light on the important role pirates played in meeting the needs of consumers in North America during the 17th and early 18th centuries, enlivening the rich history of the Indo-Atlantic market.
Jimmy's Carwash Adventure

Jimmy's Carwash Adventure

Victor Narro, L'91
A Los Angeles attorney and activist, Narro has spent decades leading campaigns on behalf of workers and immigrants. In this bilingual picture book, he brings lessons in solidarity and social justice to young readers.
The Zombie Business Cure: How to Refocus Your Company's Identity for More Authentic Communication

The Zombie Business Cure: How to Refocus Your Company's Identity for More Authentic Communication

Julie Lellis, '99
Zombie businesses frustrate customers, call negative attention to their leaders, or make irrational communications decisions. “An organization is more human,” Lellis said, “when it understands its own core values and lives by them.” Through case studies and interviews with executives from Google, Lululemon, Starbucks, and more, Lellis and co-author Melissa Eggleston offer the antidote to lifeless communications.
Secret Lives And Private Eyes

Secret Lives And Private Eyes

Heather Weidner, G'00

In this fast-paced mystery, Weidner’s protagonist is a private detective drawn into the hunt for a rockstar long thought dead and for the killer of the mayor with secrets. Great for those who like a strong female sleuth with a knack for getting herself into and out of difficult situations.

Grace Happens: Adventures In Everyday Living

Grace Happens: Adventures In Everyday Living

Tom Allen, R'80

Allen explores the concept of everyday grace in this compilation of his columns published in the faith and values section of the Richmond Times-Dispatch. “Mostly, they’re about keeping my ears and eyes open for glimpses of grace as I live the days I’ve been given,” writes Allen. He hopes you’ll catch some of those glimpses and a few grins, too.

Around The Table

Around The Table

R. Scott Hurd, B'89

Hurd employs the unique and imaginative stories of 14 biblical characters who were close to Jesus — including Thomas, Barnabas, and Mary Magdalene — to explore the mysteries of the Eucharist.

Voluntary Peasants: A Psychedelic Journey To The Ultimate Hippie Commune

Voluntary Peasants: A Psychedelic Journey To The Ultimate Hippie Commune

Melvyn Stiriss, R'64

Self-described “hippie emeritus” Stiriss, who reported for the wire service UPI and covered antiwar protests along with the Grateful Dead’s first concert in New York City, followed that ’60s energy over the edge to live the story rather than just report on it. This book chronicles his co-creation of one of the country’s largest communes, where he lived for 12 years.